The Communion Rite

Below is a reflection of "The Communion Rite"

Families and the Eucharist

In the Communion Rite we step back and think about this great gift of Jesus which we are about to receive. We gather as unique individuals at the Mass, but when we pray The Lord’s Prayer, we remember that we come together as God’s children.We pray in community for reconciliation and for forgiveness. Even the smallest child enjoys participating in the Sign of Peace, the next part of this rite. This peace gesture is an expression of reconciliation. We grasp the hand of Christ by holding the hands of the parishioners around us. We are totally aware of the Body of Christ at this moment. We pray for peace and unity for the Church and for our human family. As the Bread is broken, we pray,

“Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.” We remember the loving sacrifice of Jesus and ask for all of God’s blessings. We then move forward in procession to receive Christ in Holy Communion. We make the choice to take Jesus into our bodies, hearts and souls. Placing one hand over the other, we form a throne in order to receive the Kings of Kings. We say “Amen” before receiving Jesus. This is our “yes,” and we truly believe that we receive Jesus Christ.

For an activity for The Communion Rite go to: https://stmargaretmary.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/communion-Youth.pdf

Did you know?

The Lord’s Prayer is a community prayer for reconciliation and forgiveness. “Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us” (Roman Missal). Following our prayer to “deliver us from evil”, comes a prayer said by the presider alone, called the embolism. This short prayer continues the final petition and adds a plea for peace.

Copyright © 2008, World Library Publications, the music and liturgy division of J.S. Paluch Co., Inc. Used with permission.

The sign of peace, sometimes referred to as the kiss of peace, flows directly from the petition for peace of the Lord’s Prayer and is another opportunity for reconciliation. In the words of the great Holy Thursday hymn Ubi Caritas: “Therefore when we are together, Let us take heed not to be divided in mind. Let there be an end to bitterness and quarrels, an end to strife, And in our midst be Christ our God. Where charity and love are found, there is God” (Sacramentary).

Copyright © 2008, World Library Publications, the music and liturgy division of J.S. Paluch Co., Inc. Used with permission.

In the early church, the consecrated bread and wine were divided by the priests and deacons for distribution to the faithful. In later centuries, as the faithful began to receive communion less often, the rite of the breaking of the bread became largely symbolic. In the renewed liturgy, an effort has been made to restore the ancient meaning to this rite, also called the Fraction Rite. The action of breaking the sacred Host symbolizes Christ’s body broken for us, so that when we receive holy Communion we may be one, united in Christ.

Copyright © 2008, World Library Publications, the music and liturgy division of J.S. Paluch Co., Inc. Used with permission.

During the invitation to communion we respond, “Lord, I am not worthy to receive you, but only as the word and we shall be healed”. This prayer is based on the centurion’s prayer in Matthew 8:8 in which he asks Jesus to heal his servant. The centurion’s humility and faith amazed Jesus and Jesus granted his prayer saying, “Truly, I tell you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith” (Matthew 8:10). We, too, are to come forward with the same sense of humility and faith.

Copyright © 2008, World Library Publications, the music and liturgy division of J.S. Paluch Co., Inc. Used with permission.

Coming 9/23/18

Coming 9/30/18

More information on the Communion Rite can be found here:
Liturgy of the Eucharist

or you can download the PDF